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B'ashamanune

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B'ashamanune
Sociocultural information

Homeworld:

Erde-Tyrene[1]

Technology level:

Tier 7[1][2]

 
"Not far from this inland crater sea, over an imposing range of mountains, skinny, lithe b'ashamanune scampered across equatorial grasslands and leaped into thorny trees to escape predators. Some chose to build crude cities, as if struggling to require past greatness—and failing miserably."
— The young Manipular Bornstellar-Makes-Eternal-Lasting recounts some of what he had learned during his studying of human history.[1]

B'ashamanune were a variety of human that evolved on Erde-Tyrene over the course of nine thousand years following the Librarian's relocation of survivors of the last war against the Forerunners to their race's ancestral homeworld.[1]

Overview[edit]

B'ashamanune were skinny and lithe.[1] They resided in East Africa in the days which preceded the firing of the Halo rings in 97,445 BCE, just over an imposing range of mountains not far from Djamonkin Augh.[1][3] There, they scampered across equatorial grasslands and leaped into thorny trees to escape predators.[1] Some humans in their day chose to build crude cities, as if struggling to require past greatness—but failed miserably.[1]

Behind the scenes[edit]

Matt Davis: "I'm curious, is there an archaeological analogue for the b'ashamanune as there were for the other species present in the story?"
Greg Bear: "Hmm! Good question. I only use the name once, and seem to be referring to Lucy-type hominids, maybe Australopithecus, but at this late stage, I'm not sure!"
— Greg Bear responds to a fan's inquiry in 2017.[4]

B'ashamanune have only been mentioned once, within the first book of The Forerunner Saga, Halo: Cryptum.[1][4] When author Greg Bear was asked if he had any particular real-world species in mind when he described them, he said he may have been referring to members of the genus Australopithecus or perhaps another variety of australopithecine hominid.[4] As he was asked this over six years since publishing Cryptum, however, he claimed he was not then entirely sure what his intentions had been.[4][5] Scientific evidence demonstrates that australopithecines went extinct around 1.2 million years ago and while closely related to humans, were not human themselves, as they did not belong to the genus Homo.[6]

List of appearances[edit]

Sources[edit]